Data, Research Resources, & Blogs

This page provides links to help students and faculty conduct economic research and find economic research papers and data.  Click on a topic immediately below to go to the section of this page with information on that topic.

General guide | Finding economic research | Stata and GIS | Data directoriesU.S. national and state-level data | Census data | U.S. household-level data | Government spending and taxation data | International data | Data on health & the environment | Housing price data | Data on crime and the law | Business and finance data | Economic history data | Data on education | Blogs on economics




  • Finding economics research papers and journal articles

    • Econlit.  The best search engine for finding scholarly economics literature.
    • Williams College Library Economics Subject Guide.  Guide to resources to help you conduct research in economics, assembled by Walter Komorowski, library liason for economics.
    • Williams College Library Electronic Journals - Link to the College's extensive collection of electronic journals.
    • EconPapers - Extensive archive of economics working papers online.
    • National Bureau of Economic Research -- Hosts the leading working paper series in economics.
    • Here are some places to find literature reviews and overviews of the economics research on particular topics (these are often a good place to start when conducting research):
      • Journal of Economic Literature -- A good source for survey and review articles on economic topics.
      • Journal of Economic Perspectives -- "...aims to publish articles that will serve several goals: to synthesize and integrate lessons learned from active lines of economic research; to provide economic analysis of public policy issues; to encourage cross-fertilization of ideas among the fields of thinking; to offer readers an accessible source for state-of-the-art economic thinking; to suggest directions for future research; to provide insights and readings for classroom use..."
      • Annual Review of Economics -- "Each year, Annual Reviews critically reviews the most significant primary research literature to guide you to the principal contributions of the field and help you keep up to date in your area of research."
      • Handbooks in Economics series.   There are handbooks of economics in various different fields of economics, produced by publishers such as North-Holland and Edward Elgar.  These provide overviews of economic research in particular fields and are periodically updated with new volumes.  Try doing a keyword search in the library catalog for "handbook" "economics" and the general area of economics you are interested in (e.g., "development").








  • Census data

    • IPUMS-USA.  The IPUMS web site makes it easy to download user-friendly extracts of U.S. Census Bureau micro-level data (that is, data on families, households, and individuals).  This web site provides access to the Public Use Microdata Series (PUMS), which consists of micro-level data from the decennial U.S. census.  For the most recent few decennial censuses, there is a PUMS data set available through this web site which has a 5% sample of the entire U.S. population. For earlier censuses, there is a 1% sample of the U.S. population.  Access to the data is free, but you will need to submit an online application describing your project, and then will have to wait a few days for approval, before you can start downloading data (this is true of all the IPUMS sites).
    • IPUMS-CPS.  IPUMS-CPS makes available data from the Current Population Survey, an annual survey of  tens of thousands of U.S. households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.  Data sets are available for every year between 1962 and 2005.  The IPUMS web site makes it easy to download extracts of the data.
    • IPUMS-International.  Provides user-friendly access to census data from many countries around the world.
    • Geolytics.  Geolytics provides data from the full U.S. decennial census broken down by geographic area (as small as a census tract).  The link above describes the Geolytics product but does not provide access to the data. We do have access to the data in the Williams College library. Talk to Walter Komorowski in the library for more information.
    • The American Community Survey.  An annual survey of U.S. households, similar to the decennial census, with a very large sample size (about 1.2 million households per year). Also available in a more user-friendly format through the IPUMS-USA link above.
    • Terra Populus. Terra Populus integrates the world’s population and environmental data, including: population censuses and surveys; land cover information from remote sensing; climate records from weather stations; land use records from statistical agencies.







  • International data and data on developing countries

    • Developmentdata.org.  Provides "easy access to free, reliable developing country data. The data linked to through developmentdata.org are provided by reputable international organisations and research institutions and data documentation is available for all the data."
    • Macro Data 4 Stata.  From the web site description: "Importing publicly available datasets into statistical software is often tedious and time consuming: the original dataset needs to be converted from its original format; longitudinal datasets need to be reorganized in a form suitable for analyzing panel data; and datasets from different sources need to be carefully merged. This last step is particularly time consuming because country codes and names tend to vary across datasets. Macro Data 4 STATA addresses these issues by homogenizing several commonly used macroeconomic datasets and importing them into STATA."
    • DEVECONDATA. Datasets for Development Economists.
    • Markus Eberhard't MEDevEcon Data site. "This website links to a variety of datasets for empirical development economists, most of which are freely accessible... At the moment there are links to over 280 datasets in the macro section alone."
    • Measure DHS -- Demographic and Health Surveys for Developing Countries. This is ths source of data used in Fortson's paper on AIDS and education; similar surveys are available for many countries and many years through this web site.
    • Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development, Click on the "Data" link on their web page for links to a vast array of data sets from developing countries.
    • International Food Policy Research Institue data page.  IFPRI offers access to and links numerous publicly available, free, micro-level data sets from developing countries, including for example data on the Progresa / Opportunidades program in Mexico.
    • World Bank Living Standards Measurement Study web page. Household data sets from a large number of different developing countries.
    • Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (JPAL).  Economists who do randomized evaluation research in developing countries. Research papers are posted on their web site; they have also posted data sets for select papers.
    • IPUMS-International. User-friendly access to micro-level census data from a large number of countries around the world.
    • OECD iLibrary.  Extensive statistics on OECD nations.
    • World Bank WITS data base. Includes data on trade between each country in the world, as well as tariffs and other information.
    • World Bank data page.
    • Penn World Tables.
    • World Development Indicators (note: this is now also available through "Macro Data 4 Stata" above).
    • Center for International Development at Harvard University -- Research Datasets Page.  This site makes available numerous mostly cross-country data sets that have been used to study a variety of questions, especially those related to economic growth and development.
    • The World Values Survey.  "A place to learn more about values and cultural changes in societies all over the world."
    • Education Policy and Data Center.  "The EPDC has the world’s largest international education database with over 3.8 millon data points from 200 countries. The data comes from national and international websites including household survey datasets as well as studies and reports."
    • EdStats. "EdStats collects worldwide data on education from national statistical reports, statistical annexes of new publications, and other data sources."
    • Peter Lindert's data page.  Extensive collection of historical data from a large number of countries.
    • World Bank Doing Business Indicators.  Includes data on taxation and regulation for a large number of countries.
    • International Education Statistics.  Compiled by Friedrich Huebler.
    • Terra Populus. Terra Populus integrates the world’s population and environmental data, including: population censuses and surveys; land cover information from remote sensing; climate records from weather stations; land use records from statistical agencies.
    • This Time Is Different.  International historical data on financial crises assembled for the book This Time is Different by Carmen Reinhardt and Kenneth Rogoff.
    • U.S. Department of Energy International Energy Statistics.





  • Housing price data

    • Geolytics.  Geolytics provides data from the full U.S. decennial censuses of 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000, broken down by geographic area (as small as a census tract).  A nice feature of the Geolytics data is that they have standardized the definitions of census tracts across years, so it is possible to make consistent comparisons of the same places over time (for some of the earlier censuses, this is only available for urban census tracts). Geolytics includes data on house prices, as well as many other variables. The link above describes the Geolytics product but does not provide access to the data. We do have access to the data in the Williams College library (see Francis). Talk to Walter Komorowski in the library for more information.
    • American Housing Survey.  Data on house prices and house characteristics for a large sample of houses. Data is collected for each of 47 selected metropolitan areas approximately once every six years.
    • Zillow.  Provides data on prices of recent home sales as well as estimates of current market values of individual homes across the United States.
    • FHFA housing price indices.  Price index for constant-quality homes, broken down by geographical region in the U.S., available going back to 1976.
    • Robert Shiller's online data page.  Includes link to the Case-Shiller housing price index.











  • Blogs on economics

    • Economist's View.  Mark Thoma, Economist at University of Oregon. Posts a daily list of interesting links on economic and policy topics.
    • Marginal Revolution. An eclectic general-interest economics blog run by economists Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok of George Mason University.
    • Brad DeLong. Economist at UC Berkeley and former Clinton Administration official.
    • Greg Mankiw. Harvard economist, author of leading economics textbooks, and formerly chief economic advisor to President George W. Bush.
    • Paul Krugman. Nobel prize winning economist at Princeton, and New York Times columnist.
    • Noah Smith. Economist and Bloomberg columnist.
    • The Baseline Scenario. A blog that tracks the global economic crisis, authored by Simon Johnson (Professor at MIT, Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund), James Kwak (a Professor at U. Connecticut Law School), and Peter Boone (Associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics).
    • Calculated Risk. Finance and economics blog, with excellent up-to-date information on the state of the economy.
    • The Upshot. The New York Times blog that frequently deals with economic and policy issues.
    • Freakonomics Blog. Blog that includes posts from the authors of Freakonomics (U. Chicago Economist Steve Levitt and journalist Stephen Dubner), along with many other empirically-oriented economists.
    • Planet Money. Blog for NPR's thrice-weekly podcast on the economy.
    • Chris Blattman. Chris Blattman is an economist and political scientist at the University of Chicago who "uses field work and statistics to study poverty alleviation, political participation, the causes and consequences of violence, and public policy in developing countries."
    • Development Impact.  "News, views, methods, and insights from the world of impact evaluation." A blog by World Bank staffers highlighting interesting evidence from randomized evaluations of policy interventions in developing countries.
    • Vox. From their own description: "Vox explains the news. We live in a world of too much information and too little context. Too much noise and too little insight. And so Vox's journalists candidly shepherd audiences through politics and policy, business and pop culture, food, science, and everything else that matters."
    • VoxDev. "VoxDev is a platform for economists, policymakers, practitioners, donors, the private sector and others interested in development to discuss key policy issues. Expert contributors provide insightful commentary, analysis, and evidence on a wide range of policy challenges in formats that we hope are accessible to a wide audience interested in development..."
    • VoxEU. "VoxEU.org – CEPR’s policy portal – was set up in June 2007 to promote 'research-based policy analysis and commentary by leading economists.'"
    • Megan McArdle, Bloomberg. Blogs about economics, public policy, and politics from a libertarian-ish perspective.